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MONTOYA'S EMOTIONAL TRIBUTE TO HIS PARENTS

24 October 2018

Paul Hazlewood
Martin Montoya.

Brighton & Hove Albion defender Martin Montoya has paid tribute to the support and guidance of his father and late mother in his development as a both a person and a professional footballer.

The Spanish summer arrival spoke openly about his upbringing, which he believes was a key influence in shaping the person he is today.

He said, “The belief and the help came from my parents from a very young age.

“I needed someone to take me to training every day after school at nine years old for two years, my mum took me on the bus, on the subway, on the metro - all to training.

“Without that sacrifice, none of this would be possible - my dad also is very passionate about his football. Without their sacrifice as my parents, I wouldn’t be where I am today.”

The full-back also spoke sincerely and honestly about a difficult chapter in his life and revealed that the players and staff at one of his former teams at the time were fantastically supportive.

“I lost my mum at 17 when I was in Barca ,B and it was very tough.

“Losing any family member would be big but losing your mum at such a young age and at such a critical time in my career, it was devastating. My mum had a long-term illness, and it was very hard to deal with.

“But eventually with the help of my dad and my brother, we slowly came to terms with it. 

“Everyone at Barcelona gave me everything I needed at the time.”

The father of two reflected on the values given to him by his parents, and believes he’s passed them on to his own children as they settle into life in England.

“What my parents gave me, and I can take forward, is to be humble, work very hard, do my best for my kids and be around my family, because they are the people who are going to support you.

“The hardest thing over here is communication. Listening and trying to communicate with people is tough. In terms of adapting, the first month or two is tough, you’ve got to find schools for your kids, find the the supermarket, look for a house and the food is different too.

“But you get over it and that's what I've managed to do - it’s the language that is the main thing.

“Driving is tough, I am used to driving on the right side, and I very nearly ended up in the trees - you’ve got to concentrate very hard!”


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